What to See in the Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories is another of Canada’s territories that you might think, on first glance, doesn’t have much to offer. Well, like Nunavut and Yukon, it really depends on personal taste – if you enjoy exploring Canada’s wilderness, then all three of these destinations would be great, but if you like good hotels, shopping malls and upscale restaurants they just won’t cut it! If I was travelling to the Northwest Territories, here’s what I would want to see and do: Yellowknife – The hub of life in the Northwest Territories, Yellowknife is both the capital and largest city and it’s […]

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Yellowknife Overview

Because of the exorbitant prices of houses in Yellowknife, some people used to live in rustic houseboats on the bay near Jolliffe Island, in order to save on the price of land and local taxes.

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Nahanni Country Overview

Fort Simpson took its name from Thomas Simpson, the first governor of the merged Northwest Company and Hudson’s Bay Company. Wrigley, located along the Mackenzie Highway, is still a traditional community of Dene First Nations people, most of whom still live off the land, in the way of their ancestors. Nahanni National Park had a reputation for myth and adventure in the early 20th Century, when gold prospectors heard rumors of deposits and started arriving. Two brothers were found decapitated in the park, and stories of huge mountain men and fierce natives created many myths that are still spoken of […]

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Mackenzie Valley Overview

20 km (12 mi.) from Tulita is a bed of low-grade coal, which has been burning for centuries. It was likely ignited by lightning but according to Dene First Nations legend, it is a giant’s campfire.

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Big Lake Country Overview

Fort Smith is home to the Arctic College, where students from all over the north come to study. Most buffalo in Wood Buffalo National Park are actually hybrids of Wood Buffalo and Plains Buffalo. Fort Resolution, on the southeastern shore of Great Slave Lake, is a Chipewyan village, where residents hunt and trap in the Slave River Delta for a living, as their ancestors did. Great Slave Lake is the second largest lake in Canada, measuring 456 km (283 mi.) from east to west. Contrary to popular belief, Great Slave Lake did not have anything to do with slavery. Rather, […]

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Arctic Coast Overview

All travelers who cross the Arctic Circle are awarded a certificate, which you can pick up in Inuvik. The midwinter manhunt in 1931 for the ‘Mad Trapper of Rat River’ is a true story; after weeks of chasing the villain, he was shot on Peel River. To this day, nobody knows who he really was.

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